Belize Destinations

belize destinations

Best Places To Visit in Belize

One location. Countless quests.

Jungles. Ceremonial Caves. Reefs. Ancient Mayan temples. No matter your desires, you’ll find everything here. Just be sure to remember to take some time off.

At the north of Central America sits Belize, a spectacular country full of cultural and ecological diversity seen nowhere else in the world. Hike the ancient Mayan ruins, lost for centuries to the dense jungles. Swim with the creatures that make up the second largest barrier reef in the world. Explore the beauty of the underground through the caves carved by the country’s rivers.

Visit untouched swathes of jungle, home to the elusive jaguar. Relax along 386 kilometers of coastline staring out over the crystal blue waters of the Caribbean or on one of its over 400 tropical island paradises. Salivate over the locally caught fresh seafood. Dive the world-famous Great Blue Hole and scale Big Rock Falls.

The country’s combination of Garifuna, Mennonite, Chinese, Arab, Creole, Mayan and Mestizo influences has led to a distinct nation full of unique traditions just waiting to welcome you to Belize.

Where to go in Belize


 

Ambergris Caye

Ambergris Caye is the largest and most popular island in the northern waters of Belize and measures 25 miles long and 5 miles across. It is located just 35 miles northeast of Belize City and can be reached on a 10-minute plane ride or an hour and half boat ride. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/ambergris-caye-belize/

Belmopan, Capital of Belize

Belmopan, the current capital of Belize, holds a number of distinctions. Belmopan is the smallest national capital in the region with just 17,000 residents and was built as a brand-new city in 1970 after the long-time colonial capital of Belize City suffered catastrophic damage from Hurricane Hattie in 1961. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/belmopan

Belize City

Some of the most popular attractions in Belize City include the historic Baron Bliss Lighthouse, the country’s Supreme Court, the beautiful St. John’s Cathedral, and the House of Culture. Another popular local attraction is the Museum of Belize. First built in 1857, the structure served as a prison until 2002, when it was transformed into a museum dedicated to showcasing the country’s heritage. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/belize-city/

Belize Islands and Atolls

The waters off the coast of Belize are dotted with more than 450 beautiful small islands, known locally as cayes (“keys”), as well as tiny atolls that rise up from the floor of the Caribbean Sea. Some of these tiny islands and atolls are uninhabited, but visitors are increasingly being drawn to the rich abundance of marine life and gorgeous coral reefs that can be seen in the waters offshore. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/belize-islands-and-atolls/

Caye Caulker

If “off the beaten track” is the only type of vacation you enjoy, you owe it to yourself to spend time on Caye Caulker, the Belize getaway island that’s geologically nothing more than a sand bar over limestone that forms ancient caves atop the ocean floor. This island is so laid back and mellow, nervous business types find it downright irritating, as Caye Caulker is something of a magnet for backpacking, bohemian souls who think nothing of bringing two changes of clothing for a long visit. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/caye-caulker/

Corozal

The northernmost district (state) in the country, Corozal has long been overlooked by most tourists, although that is beginning to change.

Near the district’s capital of Corozal Town can be found the Maya ruins of Santa Rita and Cerros. The ruins now known as Santa Rita once controlled vital trade routes between present-day Mexico and Guatemala. After the Caste War ended in 1901 in neighboring Mexico, thousands of ethnic Mestizos emigrated to Corozal to become farmers. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/corozal-district/

Hopkins Belize

How did a sleepy little fishing village on the coast of the Stann Creek District in Belize gain a reputation for being the nation’s #1 cultural destination? A little luck. A rich heritage. And proximity to some of the most remarkable sights, sounds and experiences Belize has to offer—so many, you’ll understand how Hopkins gained so notable a reputation despite its small size. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/hopkins-belize/

Orange Walk

Orange Walk Town is the fourth largest town in Belize and is located 53 miles north of Belize City. The town is known for its diversity and visitors come to explore Mayan sites like Cuello and Lamanai (pictured above) and a variety of other natural parks. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/orange-walk-belize/

Placencia

Veteran travelers have been known to joke about vacations they’ve taken that sent them to a different area of one or more countries daily. “If it’s Tuesday, it must be Orange Walk!” we overheard a woman say as she tried to match the day with her itinerary. Of course, seeing lots of places when going abroad is fun, but nothing surpasses an immersion, which is why we recommend targeting one area of Belize: Placencia. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/placencia-belize/

San Ignacio

No visitor departs Belize without leaving a piece of their heart behind, and this is particularly true of travelers who have found their own version of paradise in San Ignacio, a glorious, friendly destination that’s so close to Guatemala, you can get a second stamp on your passport if you insist on leaving Belize. But, why bother? There’s so much to see, do, taste and learn in the district known simply as “Cayo,” your time and energy are much better spent in this intriguing area of Belize. Need to plan your trip so you don’t waste a minute of time? Start with our suggestions and you’ll be ready to fly. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/cayo-district-belize/

Stann Creek District

Located on the coast of southeastern Belize, the Stann Creek District is home to the popular tourist destinations of Placencia Village, the peninsula of Placencia, and the Garifuna village of Hopkins.

With approximately 34,000 residents, the Stann Creek District is home to a wide variety of indigenous and local peoples, including the Mestizos, the Creole community, the Garifuna, and descendants of the Maya. Without any large metropolitan areas, visitors are drawn to the Stann Creek District because it is a unique opportunity to explore the authentic slow-paced Central American lifestyle of Belize. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/stann-creek-district/

Toledo District

Every inch of Belize could be described as lush, but if you are interested in seeing a primeval world that’s as natural as it gets, a trip to the Toledo District will prove to be an eye-opener. There are approximately 1,700 square miles of rain forests, rivers, offshore islands, jungle and even mountains, making it the least-developed of Belize’s districts—but perhaps the most fascinating. Read more: https://www.belizehub.com/about-us/belize/toledo-district/

 

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